Blue Iguana Recovery Program

Books and Scientific Papers

Click on the PDF icon to read the full document.

Blue Iguanas 2009 SRP III
Species Recovery Plan III for Cyclura lewisi
ABSTRACT.—New strategic plan to save the Blue Iguanas, 2009 to 2011. The original Species Recovery Plan for the Grand Cayman Blue Iguana was formulated in 2001. Three years later, many of the actions laid out in that plan had been completed, and changing times demanded an update. So, in 2005 the second SRP was formulated and its implementation commenced immediately. By 2008, the Blue Iguana Recovery Programme was poised to enter a new phase, with much of the second SRP implemented and major new opportunities on the horizon. So in a December 2008 workshop on Grand Cayman, all the Programme’s partners met again, and brainstormed plans and aspirations for 2009 – 2011. The result is the third Species Recovery Plan for the Grand Cayman Blue Iguana.

This (non-printable) version of the Blue Iguana Recovery Program details the steps towards species recovery. Enjoy the colorful photos that are presented with this detailed information.

Blue Iguanas in the Scientific Press
A new technical paper on the taxonomy of Cyclura lewisi
ABSTRACT.—A recent phylogenetic study of the West Indian Rock Iguana genus Cyclura (Malone et al., 2000) indicated that Cyclura nubila lewisi on Grand Cayman has diverged from nominate Cyclura nubila in Cuba to a degree equal to or greater than the currently accepted distinction between Cyclura nubila and
Cyclura cychlura in the Bahamas.

Blue Iguana Recovery Plan
Read the Plan on-line
This (non-printable) version of the Blue Iguana Recovery Plan details the steps towards species recovery. Enjoy the colorful photos that are presented with this detailed information.

Blue Iguana Facility Upgrade Project
Volunteers assist in the upgrade of the breeding facilities on Grand Cayman
The Blue Iguana Recovery Program is in a major expansion phase, and is struggling to keep pace with successes in the captive breeding and head starting of the critically endangered Cyclura lewisi. Last year the program hatched 85 young, from eggs laid in captivity, as well as eggs collected from nests of the reintroduced population in the QE II Botanic Park. This year a similar number is expected, and the program is well on its way to its goal of hatching and headstarting 100 Blue Iguanas a year, for release into the wild at 2 years of age.